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Awards and Funding - Fellows 2007
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An Introduction to the Inaugural Class of 2007

Over the past two years, ASPB has developed the Fellow of ASPB Award to recognize and honor long-term members of the Society who have made major contributions to the discipline in diverse areas that include research, education, mentoring, outreach, and professional and public service. Having formed a committee to establish the nomination and selection criteria for the honor, ASPB announced the award earlier this year and solicited nominations in conjunction with the annual awards nomination process.

The Society realized that with so many distinguished and long-serving plant scientists eligible to receive the award, it would be both necessary and appropriate to name a large inaugural class. Indeed, over 50 fellows had been named, and their awards were announced during ASPB's annual meeting in Chicago in July. Once you have read about the members of this inaugural class of ASPB Fellows, please begin thinking about other Society members whose long-term contributions to plant biology and service to the Society would render them worthy of nomination for future Fellows Awards, an honor that may be bestowed annually on up to only 0.2% of the current membership.

It is simply impossible to introduce over four dozen heroes of plant biology and succinctly summarize their contributions to ASPB and plant science as a whole. Nevertheless, it is important to let you know at least a little about the distinguished scientists that received recognition as ASPB Fellows this year, including, in parentheses after their names, the year in which they joined the Society. Please welcome ASPB's 2007 Fellows.

by Nick Carpita
Chair, ASPB Fellows Committe


Fellow of ASPB Award Committee


Charles Arntzen (1966)
Regents Professor, Arizona State University

Charlie's primary research interest was photosynthesis, but his current interests lie in plant molecular biology and protein engineering, as well as the use of plant biotechnology for the enhancement of food quality and value, the expression of pharmacologically active products in transgenic plants, and ways to overcome health and agricultural constraints in the developing world. Charlie has been secretary–treasurer and then president of the Midwest Section, an elected member of the Executive Committee, and member of the Education Foundation board of directors. He has served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and was ASPB president in 1985. He received the Shull Award in 1979 and the Hoagland Award in 1994.


Sarah M. (Sally) Assmann (1983)
Professor, Penn State University

Sally is recognized for her research on plant signal transduction mechanisms. She currently serves on the board of directors of the Education Foundation and is ASPB president-elect for 2007–2008. She has served as monitoring editor for Plant Physiology (1994–1997) and has been a coeditor of The Plant Cell since 1998. She has also served on the Publications Committee (2000–2005) and was co-organizer of the Biology of Transpiration meeting held in 2006.




Neil Baker (1975)
Professor, University of Essex, England

Neil is well known for elucidating the factors that determine the efficiency of light utilization in photosynthesis. He has served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and has been monitoring editor since 1998. He was member and chair of the Corresponding Membership Award Committee and is currently a member of the Charles F. Kettering Award Committee.





Wendy Boss (1975)
Professor, North Carolina State University

Wendy is recognized for her studies on how inositol lipid biosynthesis is regulated in plants and what cellular processes are intertwined with the metabolism of phosphoinositides. She also aims to redesign plants to withstand increased stress by expressing genes from extremophiles. Wendy has served as member and head of the board of trustees and as an elected member of the Executive Committee. She was associate editor of Plant Physiology. A featured speaker at the Women in Plant Biology luncheon in 2006, Wendy also initiated a program sponsored by the Good Works Program to fund workshops in countries with emerging research programs.


John Boyer (1963)
Professor, University of Delaware


John has researched the metabolic mechanisms of losses in plant growth under saline or dehydrating conditions. His studies began at the level of the whole plant but use methods in biophysics, biochemistry, and molecular biology. He has been editorial board member and monitoring editor for Plant Physiology, and he has served as a member of the Future Planning and Life Member Committees. John served as an elected member of the Executive Committee and as ASPB president in 1981. He received the Shull Award in 1977 and the Barnes Life Membership Award in 2007.


Winslow Briggs (1955)
Director Emeritus, Carnegie Institute of Washington

Winslow is well known for his studies of plant photoreceptors and the effects of light on plant physiology and development. Mentor of more than 50 plant scientists, he received the Stephen Hales Prize in 1994 and the Adolf Gude Award in 2007. He has served on the editorial board and as monitoring editor of Plant Physiology. He was an editor of Annual Review of Plant Physiology and Plant Molecular Biology for well over 30 years. He was ASPB president in 1975.




Bob Buchanan (1967)
Professor, University of California at Berkeley


Bob researches photosynthesis, seed germination, and microbial biochemistry. He served for many years on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and was coeditor of the renowned ASPB textbook Biochemistry & Molecular Biology of Plants. He was the founding chair of the International Committee and serves on the Corresponding Membership Committee. He was ASPB president in 1995. Bob received the Kettering Award in 1998 and the Hales Prize in 2005.


Joe Cherry (1970)
Professor Emeritus, Auburn University

Joe is known for his studies on plant growth and development, the biochemistry of seed development, and heat-shock proteins. Joe served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology. He also served as secretary and president of the Midwest Section. A former member of the Program and Public Affairs Committees, Joe was ASPB secretary from 1981 to 1983 and president in 1984. He received the Barnes Life Membership Award in 2004.




Maarten Chrispeels (1963)
Professor, University of California, San Diego

Maarten's major research contributions are in the secretion of proteins, the transport and posttranslational modifications of vacuolar proteins, and the discovery and analysis of water channel proteins or aquaporins. He maintains a keen interest in biotechnology and its role in agricultural development and food production in the world. He was on the editorial board and served as associate editor and later editor-in-chief of Plant Physiology (1992–1999). He also served as a member of the Executive Committee and is author of Plants, Genes, and Crop Biotechnology, published by Jones & Bartlett.


Adrienne Clarke (1981)
Professor, University of Melbourne, Australia

Adrienne is known for her studies of the molecular basis of self-incompatibility, the chemistry and biology of arabinogalactan proteins, and proteinase inhibitors and their use in the control of insect development. She has served as an elected member of the Executive Committee and on the International Committee. She was a coeditor of The Plant Cell from 1991 to 1996.





Robert Cleland (1959)
Professor Emeritus, University of Washington

Bob is well known for his research on the mechanisms by which plant cell elongation is controlled, particularly through control of mechanical properties of the cell walls of elongating tissues and the way in which auxin induces a loosening of the cell wall. With David Rayle, he formulated the acid-growth theory explaining the action of auxin in wall loosening. Bob served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology from 1965 to 1980. He also served as member and chair of the Barnes Life Membership Committee. He has served as an elected member of the Executive Committee, as ASPB secretary from 1971 to 1973, and as president in 1974.

Mary Clutter (1956)
Former Assistant Director National Science Foundation

As former assistant director of the National Science Foundation, Mary was responsible for the Biological Sciences Directorate that supports all major areas of fundamental research in biology, but she has been a strong advocate for plant biology. She is a member of numerous professional societies and has served on the board of directors of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). She is a fellow of AAAS and of the Association for Women in Science.



Dan Cosgrove (1979)
Professor, Penn State University

Dan is known for his studies of the biophysics and photocontrol of cell wall loosening and for his discovery of expansins. Dan has served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and has been chair of the Education Foundation, as well as serving on numerous committees. He was ASPB president in 2000 and received the Shull Award in 1991.




Deborah Delmer (1967)
Professor Emeritus, University of California, Davis, and Former Associate Director of Food Security, Rockefeller Foundation

Debby's major area of research has been the biosynthesis and structure of the plant cell wall, with special interest in the biosynthesis of cellulose. At the Rockefeller Foundation, she dealt with issues in international agriculture. She has served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and as member and chair of the Gude Prize and International Committees. She was an elected member of Executive Committee and was ASPB president in 1999.



Machi Dilworth (1973)
Division Director, National Science Foundation

Machi serves as director of Biological Infrastructure at the National Science Foundation and has been a strong advocate for plant biology. She served as reviews editor for The Plant Cell and as member and chair of the Publications Committee. Machi received the Gude Prize in 1998.






Arthur Galston (1948)
Professor Emeritus, Yale University

Art is recognized for his work on phototropism and the physiology of polyamines in plants. In 1949, he provided the first evidence that riboflavin, rather than carotene, is the photoreceptor in phototropism. Art served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and as a member of several committees. He was ASPB president in 1962.





Elisabeth Gantt (1969)
Professor, University of Maryland

Elisabeth's research interests have focused on photosynthesis, especially on how oxygen-evolving organisms maximize the absorption and utilization of light energy. She has served as a member and chair of the Publications Committee and as a member of the Future Planning, Public Responsibilities, Awards, and Public Affairs Committees. She was the representative to the American Institute of Biological Sciences from 1994 to 1995. She was an elected member of the Executive Committee, ASPB secretary from 1985 to 1987, and ASPB president in 1988. She continues to serve on the Kettering Award Committee. Elisabeth was awarded the Hales Prize in 2002.

Robert Goldberg (1977)
Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

Bob's research goal is to establish the genes and gene networks required for seed development. He envisioned and was the founding editor-in-chief of The Plant Cell and was founding chair of the Education Foundation. He conceived and starred in the ASPB Education Foundation film History's Harvest: Where Food Comes From.




Mary Helen Goldsmith (1958)
Professor, Yale University

Mary Helen is known for her pioneering work in polar auxin transport and auxin-induced growth, with a focus on the role of H+-ATPases and ion channels in cell elongation. Mary Helen served on numerous committees, including the Corresponding Membership, Education, and Public Affairs Committees. She was an elected member of the Executive Committee that advocated the founding of The Plant Cell. Mary Helen was ASPB president in 1991.



Wilhelm Gruissem (1986)
Professor, Federal Institute of Technology, Switzerland

Willi's research focuses on fundamental plant processes, including cell cycle regulation and differentiation and functional genomics of isoprenoid synthesis. He is also developing new tools for proteome analysis and bioinformatics, including Genevestigator. He was associate editor and coeditor of The Plant Cell from 1990 to 1995 and feature editor of Plant Physiology from 2000 to 2002. He was coeditor of the renowned ASPB textbook Biochemistry & Molecular Biology of Plants, and he was named Corresponding Member in 2007.



Thomas Guilfoyle (1970)
Professor, University of Missouri

Tom is acknowledged for his pioneering research on transcriptional regulation, auxin-regulated gene expression, and auxin signaling. He has served on the editorial board and as associate editor of Plant Physiology (1992–1995). Tom has been a coeditor of The Plant Cell since 2003. He also served on the Publications Committee.





Roger Hangarter (1979)
Professor, Indiana University

Roger investigates the physiological and molecular mechanisms by which plants perceive and respond to environmental stimuli. Roger is creator of the Plants in Motion website and of sLowlife, an art installation that is exhibited nationally. He also created an award-winning film documenting the return of the 17-year cicadas. Roger has served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and has been a member of the Program, Public Affairs, and Pioneer Student Award Committees. He served as ASPB secretary from 2001 to 2003 and was ASPB president in 2004. Roger received the Excellence in Teaching Award in 2007.


Peter Hepler (1976)
Professor, University of Massachusetts

Peter's prime areas of research have been the structure and physiology of plant cells during division, growth, and development, with specific attention to the roles of the cytoskeleton and regulatory ions. Peter served as coeditor of an ASPB Current Topics in Plant Physiology volume on Calcium in Plant Growth and Development and has served on the editorial board and as associate editor of Plant Physiology. He has been an editorial board member of The Plant Cell since 2003. He has also served on the Minority Affairs Committee.


Ann Hirsch (1972)
Professor, University of California, Los Angeles

Ann's major area of research is in plant–microbe interactions, especially symbiotic interactions, and the signal transduction pathways related to nodulin gene expression. She served as monitoring editor, associate editor, and feature editor of Plant Physiology, and she has been a coeditor of The Plant Cell since 2003. She is the founding editor and writer for ASPB's Women Pioneers in Plant Biology website (1999 to present). She served as an elected member of the Executive Committee and as chair of the Women in Plant Biology Committee.




Thomas K. Hodges (1961)
Professor Emeritus, Purdue University

Tom is well known for his pioneering studies on the biochemistry of ion transport across cell membranes and genetic engineering of crop plants. He was a member of the editorial board of Plant Physiology and a member and chair of the Long-Range Planning Committee that initiated The Plant Cell, member and chair of the Charles Reid Barnes Life Membership and Corresponding Members Committees, and an elected member of the Executive Committee. He also served as representative to the American Institute of Biological Sciences. He was president of the Midwest Section. Tom received the Shull Award in 1975.


Steven Huber (1975)
Professor, USDA–Agricultural Research Service, University of Illinois

Steve is renowned for his work on regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon–nitrogen metabolism in plant source and sink tissues and their impact on growth and development and crop yield. He was a member of the editorial board and then monitoring editor of Plant Physiology. He served on the Life Membership and Shull Award Committees and is presently an elected member of the Executive Committee.



Andre Jagendorf (1951)
Professor, Cornell University

Andre is recognized for his work in photophosphorylation, where his demonstration of ATP synthesis driven by a transmembrane pH gradient in the dark validated Mitchell's chemiosmotic hypothesis. Andre served on the editorial board for Plant Physiology and on the editorial committee of Annual Review of Plant Physiology. He was ASPB president in 1967. Andre received the Kettering Award in 1978 and the Barnes Life Membership Award in 1989.




Russell Jones (1965)
Professor, University of California at Berkeley

Russ is well known for his research on hormone action in seeds, with an emphasis on the cereal aleurone. He served as a member of the editorial board and then associate editor of Plant Physiology. Russ received the Charles Reid Barnes Life Membership Award in 2002. He served as ASPB president in 1993. He is coeditor of ASPB's Biochemistry & Molecular Biology of Plants.




Rich Jorgensen (1995)
Professor, University of Arizona

Rich's current research interests include RNA silencing mechanisms in plants, applications of sense-RNA silencing to functional genomics, and chromatin-based control of gene expression. Rich served on the Program Committee from 1998 to 2002. He served as organizer and chair of ASPB's special conference on plant genetics. He was a coeditor of The Plant Cell from 2000 to 2003 and is currently editor-in-chief.



Kenneth Keegstra (1977)
Professor, Michigan State University

Ken is recognized for his research on the biogenesis of chloroplasts, especially the import of cytoplasmically synthesized proteins, and on the biosynthesis of plant cell wall components, especially the non-cellulosic polysaccharides. He served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and was an elected member of the Executive Committee and a member of the Board of Trustees. He was ASPB president in 1997. Ken received the Hales Prize in 2006.




Joe Key (1958)
Professor Emeritus, University of Georgia

Joe is recognized for his pioneering work on auxin-regulated transcription of RNAs essential for cell elongation and for the expression and characterization of environmental stress–regulated genes and proteins. Joe was an associate editor of Plant Physiology and has served on numerous committees. He was an elected member of the Executive Committee and a member of the Board of Trustees. He was also secretary– treasurer, vice president, and president of the Midwest Section. He was ASPB president in 1976. Joe received the Barnes Life Membership Award in 2000.



Leon Kochian (1979)
Professor, USDA–Agricultural Research Service, Cornell University

Leon is well known for his work on root biology and ion transport processes as they relate to mineral nutrient acquisition and plant responses to environmental stresses, phytoremediation, and gene identification for traits that facilitate crop improvement in these areas. Leon is a monitoring editor for Plant Physiology. He has also served on the Futures Committee.



Brian Larkins (1973)
Associate Vice Chancellor for Research, University of Nebraska

Brian is known for his research on molecular and cellular aspects of seed development. He has served on the editorial boards of Plant Physiology and The Plant Cell (1989–1993) and was editor-in-chief of The Plant Cell from 1993 to 1998. He was also an elected member of the Executive Committee and served as ASPB president in 1998. He received the Shull Award in 1983 and the Hoagland Award in 1997.




Christopher Leaver (1966)
Professor, University of Oxford, England

Chris has established an internationally recognized group studying mitochondrial genome organization, expression, and function in higher plants; the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and function during plant development; and programmed cell death in plants. He has a strong interest in the public understanding of science and has been actively involved in the current debate on genetically modified crops in the United Kingdom and Europe. He served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and was elected Corresponding Member in 2003.



Sharon Long (1974)
Professor and Dean, Stanford University

Sharon has advanced the understanding of the process of nitrogen fixation and the signaling pathways used by nitrogen-fixing bacteria and plants, addressing questions relevant to agricultural productivity and to energy conservation. She has been a member of several education committees, including the Committee on Undergraduate Science education, the Bio2010 project, and the Board on Science Education. Sharon has served on the editorial boards of both journals, as well as on the Shull Award Committee. She received the Shull Award in 1989.



William Lucas (1975)
Professor, University of California, Davis

Bill has contributed key observations, methodologies, and insights that have promoted and redirected the study of plasmodesmal biology. His work has supported the concept that plasmodesmata serve regulatory roles, mediating the cell-to-cell movement of proteins and ribonucleoprotein complexes. He has served on the Program and Shull Awards Committees and was on the editorial board of Plant Physiology for 15 years. Since 2003, he has been a coeditor of The Plant Cell. He received the Gibbs Medal in 1997.



William Ogren (1964)
Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois

Bill is well known for his studies on the biochemistry, physiology, and molecular genetics of photosynthesis and photorespiration. Bill served on the editorial board and then as associate editor of Plant Physiology and had an eight-year tenure on the Executive Committee in various capacities. He has served on the Futures and Monographs Committees, and he received the 1986 Kettering Award. Bill was ASPB secretary from 1987 to 1989 and president in 1990.




Don Ort (1971)
Professor, USDA–Agricultural Research Service, University of Illinois

Don is an international expert in photosynthesis research, currently specializing in the impacts of abiotic factors, including climate change on photosynthetic performance. Don has served on the editorial board, then as associate editor, and currently as editor-in-chief of Plant Physiology. He served on the Education Foundation and was chair of the Board of Trustees from 1999 to 2001. He was ASPB secretary from 1993 to 1995 and president in 1996. Don received the Kettering Award in 2006.



Bernard Phinney (1952)
Professor Emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles

Bernie continues a distinguished career in determining the structure, metabolism, and function of gibberellins. He received the Hales Prize in 1984 in recognition of his successful efforts to use chemistry, genetics, and physiology to unravel the gibberellin biosynthetic pathway in maize and was named Charles Reid Barnes Life Member in 1987. He has served on the Stephen Hales Prize and Barnes Life Committees, as well as on the editorial board of Plant Physiology. Bernie was ASPB president in 1989.



Ralph Quatrano (1968)
Professor, Washington University

Ralph is recognized for his research on how plant cells establish polarity and how they regulate gene expression in response to abscisic acid during desiccation. He is a strong advocate for the use of Physcomitrella to solve otherwise recalcitrant problems of plant biology. Ralph served on the editorial board of The Plant Cell for 15 years, the last five as editor-in-chief. He was ASPB president in 1992, and he established the Public Affairs Committee and served as its first chair.



Robert Rabson (1952)
Former Program Director, U.S. Department of Energy

Bob created a new program in the Department of Energy to fund basic plant and microbial biology research affecting energy sciences. He was an exceptional advocate of plant biology. Bob served as ASPB treasurer from 1989 to 1991, as a member of the Board of Trustees, and on the Publications Committee. He received the Gude Prize in 1986.





Natasha Raikhel (1986)
Professor, University of California, Riverside

Natasha's research is on the signals that target proteins to the nucleus and to the vacuole of plant cells and the identification of the genes and gene products required for vesicle-mediated protein transport in the secretory pathway. She served as a member of Publications and Shull Award Committees and of the editorial boards for both Plant Physiology and The Plant Cell, and she was editor-in-chief of Plant Physiology from 2000 to 2005. She was an elected member of the Executive Committee. Natasha received the Hales Prize in 2004.



Doug Randall (1969)
Professor, University of Missouri

Doug is known for his studies of metabolism regulation in plants,?in particular, the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex as a primary site at which photosynthetic carbon metabolism interacts with mitochondrial respiration and photorespiration. Doug served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and was member of the Publications, Life Membership, Program, Public Affairs, and Constitution and Bylaws Committees. He has also served on the Education Foundation and Board of Trustees. Doug was ASPB secretary from 1991 to 1993. He received the Barnes Life Membership in 2006.


Clarence "Bud” Ryan (1968)
Professor, Washington State University

Bud is renowned for his studies of polypeptide hormones and receptors, the structure and function of proteinase inhibitors, and wound-induced signaling for plant defense. Bud served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and was president of the Western Section. He received the Hales Prize in 1992.




Thomas Sharkey (1976)
Professor, University of Wisconsin

Tom studies the physiology of photosynthesis, especially the exchange of carbon dioxide and isoprene between plants and the atmosphere and the export of carbon from the Calvin cycle. He was a member of the Program Committee, and the Hoagland Award Committee and was chair of the Public Affairs Committee. He was on the editorial board of Plant Physiology, including five years as monitoring editor. He has also has served as secretary–treasurer, vice-chair, and chair of the Midwest section.



James Siedow (1976)
Vice Provost for Research, Duke University

Jim's research has focused on plant respiratory processes, specifically the nature and regulation of the cyanide-resistant respiratory pathway found in plant mitochondria. His university honored him with the Trinity College Distinguished Teaching Award in 1984. He served on the editorial board and was an associate editor of Plant Physiology. He was chair of the Board of Trustees and chair and long-time member of the Public Affairs Committee. He is currently chair of the Education Foundation. Jim was ASPB secretary from 1989 to 1991 and president in 1994.



Chris R. Somerville (1979)
Director, Carnegie Institution of Washington

Chris has focused on the molecular genetics of Arabidopsis in a broad range of topics, including photorespiration, starch metabolism, lipid metabolism, polysaccharide synthesis, and aspects of development. He was a member of the special committee that envisioned The Plant Cell and served on the Publications and Shull Awards Committees. He served on the editorial board and then as monitoring editor of Plant Physiology, and he was associate editor of The Plant Cell. He is a founding editor of ASPB's online Arabidopsis Book. He received the Shull Award in 1987 and the first Gibbs Medal in 1993.


L. Andrew Staehelin (1980)
Professor Emeritus, University of Colorado

Andrew is recognized for his research on the functional organization and dynamic properties of the organelles and cytoskeletal arrays that produce new plant cell walls during cytokinesis and allow cell walls to expand during cell growth. Andrew has served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and on the Barnes Life Award Committee. He was founder and organizer of the new Keystone and Gordon Conferences for plant cell biology.




Heven Sze (1971)
Professor, University of Maryland

Heven is noted for her work on the discovery of transporters for essential minerals and toxic ions, vacuolar H+-ATPases, and calcium transport. Heven served on the editorial board, as monitoring editor, and as features editor for Plant Physiology. She also served on the Program, Future, Gibbs Medal, and Corresponding Member Committees. She is currently Mid-Atlantic section representative to the Executive Committee.




Lincoln Taiz (1972)
Professor, University of California, Santa Cruz

Linc is renowned for his work on cell wall mobilization in barley aleurone layers; cell wall biophysics; and the structure, function, and evolution of vacuolar H+-ATPases. Linc served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and is the author of several ASPB-sponsored publications. His textbook with Eduardo Zeigler, Plant Physiology, serves as the authoritative text for students entering the plant biology community.




Tony Trewavas (1994)
Professor, University of Edinburgh, Scotland

Tony is well known for his investigations of the role of calcium in signal transduction during plant development. His notable achievements include the construction of transgenic luminous plants in the early 1990s and the establishment of Ca2+ as a primary transduction pathway in plant cells. Tony served on the editorial board of Plant Physiology and received the Corresponding Membership Award in 1999.


Masamitsu Wada (1986)
Professor, National Institute for Basic Biology, Japan

Masamitsu's research has involved elucidating the mechanisms of photomorphogenesis from photoperception to final responses through signal transduction pathways. His work on chloroplast photorelocation movement serves as an elegant model to study photomorphogenesis. Since 2003, Masamitsu has been coeditor of The Plant Cell. He received the Corresponding Membership Award in 2005.




Jan Zeevaart (1961)
Professor, Michigan State University

Jan is renowned for his research on the physiology of flowering; the structure, biosynthesis, and function of gibberellins; and the regulation of abscisic acid biosynthesis. Jan served on the editorial board and then as monitoring editor and associate editor of Plant Physiology from 1998 to 2003. He also has served on the Corresponding Membership, Constitution and Bylaws, and Awards Committees. Jan received the Hales Prize in 2000.

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